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Bidding on 2 Gliders

 
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FrozeInNY



Joined: 07 Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Location: Mid Tennessee

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 1:41 pm    Post subject: Bidding on 2 Gliders Reply with quote

There are currently 2 Gliders on the Bay that are sorta close (less than 5 hrs away) that I am bidding on. One is a G4B #7365, the other a G100 #12869.

My first question is how do I remove the micrometer gauge and the extension table?? These pieces look like they could be easily damaged during the journey home.

Other question is which is more desirable for conversion for woodworking.

Thanks
Dan
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For starters here's the G100 http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hammond-Glider-Trimosaw-Letterpress-Make-Up-Saw-/171210960629

and here's the G4b http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hammond-Glider-Trim-O-Saw-/191025696575

The G100 was the newer of the two and was the final ultimate incarnation of the Hammonds. That being said, the G4b is a fine saw in itself and has a bit ore blade height than the G100 when using the blade above the table,

The G100 definitely has the finger and the clamp, the G4b has at least the finger. In my book m the finger is by far the most valuable accessory.

I'd ask about single phase if that is important to you. These saws were mostly used in industrial settings and for the most part are three phase. Swapping a motor is definitely doable, but expensive if you don;t have one kicking about. VFD is always a possibility as well.

The G100 seems to be in decent shape. Hard to tell from the single photo about the G4b,

I'm not sure you will make a wrong decision here, but I'd lean towards the G100

I'm not quite sure what you mean by conversion to woodworking though. They work pretty well right from the start. The G4 might be a bit easier to add a larger blade, but it is doable on the G100 too.

Pete
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I didn't answer the finger scale removal. it is attached with two socket head cap screws from below the table and two taper pins. The extension table is attached to it. pretty quick to remove.

Pete
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FrozeInNY



Joined: 07 Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Location: Mid Tennessee

PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 12:58 pm    Post subject: Update on Bidding on 2 saws Reply with quote

Update on my previous post on the Gliders: The G100 was withdrawn from the bay auction but I got the G4B for the opening bid of $100. Cost more for gasoline to go pick it up!

Holy Led Zepplins Batman, this thing is heavy. Anyone weighed one? 3 of us struggled to get it into my trailer. I will dismantle as much as possible before I attempt to move it into my shop. Dismantling it will also allow me to delead the pieces as I go rather than contaminate by shop area.

The saw seems top heavy. Is this an issue for people that have build mobile bases for the saw? Did you increase the footprint to make it more stable?


I understand why people do not want to deal with a pica scale unless they are a printer. To most of us the Pica system makes even less sense than the metric system. In defense of the metric system I would say that a system using a 10 multiple to go from one unit to the next makes calculations easy. What is 1/5 th of a foot? What is 1/5 th of 3 inches?

Changing the Pica scale to Inch is an easy low cost change within the capabilities of us with no metal machining equipment. What I do not understand are the advantages of changing the threaded rod.
1. Why does it matter whether the gauge moves .166044 inches per rev or .25 inches per rev? If you are looking at the inch scale for setting the gauge what is the difference? Aesthetics?
2. Why does it matter that the new acme rod has a left hand thread? Would not a more common RH thread have been cheaper.
3. Do you really need a lathe to make the open nut?
4. Would a scroll saw be adequate to cut the brass?
5. At over $100 just for the tap, plus the brass, plus the acme rod, plus having the ends of the acme turned down, the modification would seem expensive and of marginal utility. What am I missing???
I have seen 10 page parts lists on the web but no assembly manuals. Is a manual available?

Lots of questions because I am just getting started. Please don't take offense at my stupidity.

Dan
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 10:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Dan, Congrats on the saw! you should be quite happy with your purchase. How is the condition now that you have it in person?

No doubt they are heavy- ballpark 450 lbs by catalog weight.

to answer some od your bullet questions.

1. Why does it matter whether the gauge moves .166044 inches per rev or .25 inches per rev? If you are looking at the inch scale for setting the gauge what is the difference? Aesthetics?

Well, it matters to me because I can dial in a measurement with the dial, just just by looking at where the pointer is. If I set my saw to 0 and on 6", it cuts 6", turn it one revolution and it cuts 5 7/8". Pretty convenient if you do accurate work. Otherwise you are just lining up to the tape measure.

2. Why does it matter that the new acme rod has a left hand thread? Would not a more common RH thread have been cheaper.

The RH thread would make it advance in a counter-intuitive way. Plus not much cost savings, precision acme is often left hand thread.

3. Do you really need a lathe to make the open nut?

could do it on a mill. or maybe with a vise. I use what I have, which is a whole bunch of metal working machinery.

4. Would a scroll saw be adequate to cut the brass?
NO. bandsaw would work though- even at woodworking speeds. Lots of filing afterwards.

5. At over $100 just for the tap, plus the brass, plus the acme rod, plus having the ends of the acme turned down, the modification would seem expensive and of marginal utility. What am I missing???

See post 1. Plus, my $50 used tap has now converted numerous saws. I am so satisfied with the time I spent to do these conversions- it is like a machinist tool in my wood shop.


I've never put on on wheels to answer that question

Metric is fine- I just don't use it, thus my line in jest that pica is about as good as metric.

It's not that complicated a machine. not hard to assemble especially with a parts explosion, which are about. Just ask here if you get stumped.

Pete
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FrozeInNY



Joined: 07 Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Location: Mid Tennessee

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 6:45 pm    Post subject: Update on my G4B Reply with quote

As Pete observed, there was no clamp on the saw. Somewhere I read the clamp was an option on some of the saws. Definitely missing is the batter assembly.

The previous owner, Lloyd, was a believer in lubrication. He had a pump oiler sitting next to the saw and he used it religiously. My fingers get greasy just looking at the saw. Until recently the saw was in daily use so everything moves freely with no catches.

The paint is in good condition with only a few scrapes on the waste trolly. A solvent wipedown and a coat of wax may be all the bright work needs.

From the wiring I believe the motor is 220v single phase behemoth, but its an open drip proof design so it will go on the shelf. I have a 1 HP 3 phase TEFC motor on the shelf, if its the correct rpm I will convert the saw to 3 phase using an extra VFD I have knocking about. (I know, I'm weird)

Dan
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Mon Jan 20, 2014 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dan,

The clamp isn't the most useful accessory for woodworking- I rarely use mine. Although i appreciate that they would be essential for cutting small pieces of type. They do come up for sale now and again. I'm pretty sure the clamps were standard equipment.

As far as the motor is concerned. Unless it is underpowered I'd run that current motor until it failed. Those old motors can often take a lot of abuse. and they are often sporting a 3/4" shaft which is not exactly common on newer motors. Save the labor of covering it over and just run it!

I like using a standard household grease cutting solvent like fantastic, 409 or greased lighting for cleaning up machines. Often they are much gentler on the paint and take care of the years of grime and in this case wicked over oiling

Pete
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