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Using different Blades on Hammond Saws

 
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collectric



Joined: 05 Dec 2012
Posts: 2
Location: oregon

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 1:21 pm    Post subject: Using different Blades on Hammond Saws Reply with quote

Has anyone turned the hub the blade goes on down to 5/8 inch. From photos on this site it looks like it would work. Then you could use more common blades and make a drill jig to add the mounting holes. Is there
a reason no one seems to be doing it?

I haven't unloaded my (new Cool ) G100 yet, but have been doing a bit of reading.

Also is there any chance of finding a name plate for the front of the drawer?

Thanks,
Tom
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tom, I have been mainly running forrest blades on my saws which in the 7 1/4" size come with a diamond knock-out which by chance fits the funny sized arbor perfectly.

To run larger blades on the saw which i made an arbor for, i do run 5/8" bored blades. These are two slightly larger forrest blades.

I would be hesitant to run a bigger blade with just the three screws holding it in place, so I am not sure how useful this mod is.

I do believe I have heard of folks doing it. Any one else?

Not sure if you are going to be able to find a new bucket tag. It might be a cool project to reproduce. I think I would try to add a backplate to make it a bit more stable and mimic the beautiful cast tags on my other equipment.

Ay pics? Serial Number? Congrats on the saw, What will you use it for?

Pete
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collectric



Joined: 05 Dec 2012
Posts: 2
Location: oregon

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 3:49 pm    Post subject: G-100 Reply with quote

Pete,
Used a come-a-long to get it out of the van and on the cart. The easy way for an old fart Laughing

Serial # 10978











Hard to take photos in the hole it will live in for awhile.

Photos don't show them, but it came with the bucket, clamp, guard and light.

Now I need to find a motor and build a rolling base. I have an AO Smith 3/4 HP motor that might just fit perfectly, but I would rather have more horses Cool

I will do woodworking with the saw.

Tom
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marvin



Joined: 05 Jan 2013
Posts: 2
Location: Western NC

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just picked up a G140 # 10682 and did turn the arbor down to .625" drilled a 7 1/4 blade. I got these cheap blades on fleabay.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/160615789929?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649
It says used but they were new and really nice, work well.
I used my DRO on the B'port. Bolt hole circle of the 3 screws is 1.0325". I had to use a carbide drill to drill the 3 holes. I didn't have a carbide countersink so just used RHCS's.
I'm not sure about using a Forrest blade as I do mostly aluminum. Perhaps the small blades are different but I seem to remember with my 12" Woodworker II not to cut aluminum because the carbide is harder/more brittle (probably C5 or C6). Anyway, these cheap blades seem to work fine.
Next time I order from McMaster C. I will order a rule and do Pete's modification.

BTW, Nico, your shop is too clean!!
Marvin
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 10:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Marvin, Great to get you onboard here.

Congrats on the hammond, That is a very late model extended finger scale saw. A very desirable machine.

Indeed Forrest blades are C5 carbide and not suitable for cutting aluminum, as that grade of carbide is too brittle and will chip.

C2 carbide like the blade you bought of off eBay is suitable for aluminum and acceptable for wood as well. Although it does not take as keen an edge as the C5 which makes it slightly less of a performer in wood.

I actually have the blade in the auction in my drawer. I of course paid over $40 from mcmaster. I found it to ring like crazy. I replaced it with a tenyru that has expansion slots lasered into it and found the difference to be incredible. I was very disappointed by the morse. Perhaps I will have to put it on my saw again to see what annoyed me so, because at 2 for $10 I should buy more! I should mention I am running these on the saw that I converted to having a 5/8" arbor, so not a true comparison, but I think my arbored machine is superior to the hammond three screw system.

On another note, I trued a hammond facepate on my lathe for a saw I am fixing up for a friend and was thinking how wimpy that plate is. It is so soft and easy deformed. It would be pretty easy to make one up out of steel. I was also thinking more about the concept of making an arbored saw with just the plate rather than replacing the whole spindle. I think it would actually work pretty well and would be easy to swap back and forth for cutting flush. I may have to play with this concept.

Pete


Last edited by crzypete on Mon Jan 07, 2013 10:06 pm; edited 1 time in total
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nektai



Joined: 17 Dec 2004
Posts: 1019
Location: Long Island, NY

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 8:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Marvin, Yes my shop is always spotless in that photograph! The reality is that I have been cleaning for two weeks and I can only now see the floor!

Great to have you onboard! What is a RHCS? Some kind of screw head shape?
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marvin



Joined: 05 Jan 2013
Posts: 2
Location: Western NC

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HI Nico, RHCS= round head cap screw (round head allen bolt) (4mm metric if I remember correctly).

The two blades I got don't seem to ring and they aren't branded Morse like in the pic. They cut aluminum very nicely. If you need some drilled I would be happy to do so. You could have them shipped here and I'll even throw in some RHCS's!

Good to hear from you. Are you coming down any time soon?
Marvin

P.S. Oops, sorry wrong it's should BHCS, button head cap screw.
BTW, I only paid $300 for the 140 but it has a 1HP 3 phase motor on it which is no problem since I have a 3 ph converter (1 ph would be better)
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 11:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Marvin, I;m pretty sure the screws are not metric. 8-32's IIRC.

Funny that you are using button heads. I guess that if you don't plan on raising it past the table, they wont get in the way. I would be tempted to add washers, or perhaps even an entire plate to further stabilize the blade.

Good tip on the saws being legit. I will have to order a pair. No need to drill them out for me, as I run them on my 5/8ed arbored saw. That price is cheaper than resharpening.

Pete
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kmcsmart



Joined: 24 Aug 2014
Posts: 10
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2015 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="crzypete"]

On another note, I trued a hammond facepate on my lathe for a saw I am fixing up for a friend and was thinking how wimpy that plate is. It is so soft and easy deformed. It would be pretty easy to make one up out of steel. I was also thinking more about the concept of making an arbored saw with just the plate rather than replacing the whole spindle. I think it would actually work pretty well and would be easy to swap back and forth for cutting flush. I may have to play with this concept.

Pete[/quote]

Pete,
Did you ever try this? Bob Vaughan said in his article that making a new face plate would not be as accurate as making a complete new shaft but that wouldn't be the case if you gave the entire shaft to the machinist to turn the new face plate right?

Turning just a new faceplate seems like a great option since you can go back to the conventional blade when you need to.
Karen
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2015 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Karen,

I would have no concerns about the accuracy. I would think it less rigid than a brand new arbor.

Never did do it though. In h=fact, I forgot that I proposed it! Not a bad idea.

Pete
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