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Fabricating a planer dust hood

 
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2005 9:02 am    Post subject: Fabricating a planer dust hood Reply with quote

Here are some pics of the Hood I am fabricating for the oliver planer I restored. you can see the planer here http://machinejunkie.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3

here is the hood I am "copying" I believe it is an original oliver product.




I first mocked it up in cardboard


Then began the tack welding process, I made the hose hook-up with a slip roll.



fully tacked together



more pics to come as work progresses.

Pete
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nektai



Joined: 17 Dec 2004
Posts: 1019
Location: Long Island, NY

PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2005 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rumor has it that you had to use someones 4' bending break to get this far. Does this mean that you will now have to buy one? So far so good! What is left besides making it look good?
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2005 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All tools in good time- Definitely liked the brake- it was the type that folds up, and the four foot size was sweet.

I welded the hinges on the hood today and attached it to the machine. Test runs have it as being much better than the old one, but still lets some chips fall back down.

Next step, weld it seamless, although I am half tempted to go overboard and weld in some curves flaring out from the port- like the oliver. These would improve the flow pattern, but it would be a pain, and probably not worth it.

Pete
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The latest photo- in place and sucking.

Still need to complete the welding and still debateing the fillets. Soon to begin: the debate of paint color black or gray, oh the choices...... Rolling Eyes

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Captain KIRK



Joined: 04 Mar 2005
Posts: 62
Location: New York

PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 7:46 pm    Post subject: planer Reply with quote

Pete,
I just looked at the before and after pics of the planer, Holy shit!!! that looks great!!.
I am assuming that it runs as nice as it looks.

How long did it take you.

Kirk
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Kirk, thanks for the props. I think the paint and cleaning took the better part of an extended weekend with some late nights thrown in. I am still working on some of the details, but the punch list is shortening.

I am still fine tuning the running part, the oliver manual is not the most detailed when it comes to directions on setting- it has lines like- adjust until it feeds well....... But right now it is running fairly well.

Pete
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Ron
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2006 9:08 pm    Post subject: Oliver Planer Reply with quote

Pete,
The planer looks great. I have recently purchased an old 399 myself. It needs the bearings replaced and I was wondering if you have any words of advice before I get started.
Thanks,
Ron
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2006 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Ron, It was an interesting job, I can walk you through it, and can post some pics of doing it myself. Had to alter some of my larger pullers, and scratch my head about 37 times.

I have a manual for the machine now, ddn't when I did the bearings, it would have helped a bit.

Let's dscuss this in the general forum.

Pete
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2006 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Pete,
I am a little intimidated to get started until I finish the project I am working on (cradle). Did you start with removing the chain drive and pulling the shaft out from that end? How many bearings are involved and where did you purchase them?
Thanks for the help.
Ron
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ron, The motor has to be completely disassembled. The cutterhead and bearings will come out that side. I will start a new post in the general forum with some pictures.
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It;s been a seriously long time since I made this hood. Seven years if I trust the dates on my post. It always had some problems from the eddys created in the four corners. This was especially a problem when I was planing maple which comes off in very long shavings. Wit a large job in maple about to be run through the planer, I took a day this week to remedy the problem.

My original plan was to simply add four fillets it the hood, but as I thought about it, I realized I could just as easily up the size of the outlet to 6". The dust pipe in the new shop is 6" within 3' of the planer, so it seemed like a pretty easy change.

I started by cutting a strip of steel to make the ring for the outlet. I show this blurry picture because it is going to be pertinent later.


The strip is run through my slip roll.


Until it becomes a full circle.


It gets removed by slipping off of the end.


Then clamped


and tack welded


and ugly fully welded. I am just remembering how to do this. It has been a while since I TIG welded!


the old outlet is cut off by grinding the tack welds. Note the lines that I will be cutting on the main body of the hood.


I use my jigsaw with a metal cutting blade and it makes quick work of the hood,


All butchered


Tacking the ring in place


tacked


Next, I decide to simply remove the side pieces and bend a single piece to cover the sides. I should have figured this out sooner as I could have saved some cutting. In the end, I saved a bunch of welding, so it definitely was the right call. here I am mocking it up with cardboard.


What happens next is sad. As in the first photo, I was working on my stomp shear cutting the side panels out. I made my first cut and carefully put my ruler on the saw next to it so I did not accidentally cut it. I noted to myself that it would be easy to accidentally have it slip into the shear. On the second cut....


Next, I bend the pieces with my press brake. In my earlier hood building experience, i had to borrow a friends brake, this is a nice addition to the shop- it is 4' wide and 12 tons, air powered.


The piece is nicely formed.


and tacked into place


Lots of welding. I go for broke and weld all the seams shut. My welding does improve.


All done and ground.


bondoed up


sanded and ready for paint. (I probably should have done a second coat of bondo, but I was getting pretty tired of the project by now


a little paint. It makes me remember how much I hate painting with spray bombs. To make matters worse, the tip kept clogging.


All done and in place


I ordered some hose from mcmaster to get it ducted in place. After a day and a half of waiting for it (normally I get my mcmaster shipments at 9:00 am, I called to track the package. It was delivered the day before at 9:00 am! I looked everywhere and couldn't find it. I ended up walking up my driveway and finding it on my neighbor's porch!

So the test boards went through with excellent results. Maple chips going up the duct with nothing hanging around in the hood. A very successful project and I am ready to plane away. I changed the knives while i had it apart- I am pretty sure this is the first time I have done that in seven years as well. That made a nice difference too!

Only question left, does anyone have a replacement Lufkin rule for me?

Pete
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chathamworkshop



Joined: 11 Sep 2010
Posts: 72
Location: Chatham, NJ

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As always, a professional job Pete. That one inch increase on the diameter of the outlet really made a difference on the volume you are pulling as you witnessed with the test boards. Glad to see you lost just the ruler and not a finger!

Bill
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Bill, Thanks for the reply!

It is amazing that the The 6" pipe has almost 50% more capacity than the 5" 28.3 cubic inches to 19.6 ci.

The ruler was too funny! I am annoyed and amused at the same time!

Pete
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chathamworkshop



Joined: 11 Sep 2010
Posts: 72
Location: Chatham, NJ

PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, Pete: Would you believe I just brought home an Oliver 299 today (See attached picture)! I need a wider planer and it fits the bill. I would like to put it to work quickly, but know that the electrics will have to be upgraded to handle 240V as it is wired for 440V, and hopefully this is the only change that will need to be made. But you never know what you will encounter with a used machine until you get a chance to look at it more carefully. So I am keeping my fingers crossed.
The reason I added all this to this topic is that as you see, I was fortunate to get a dust hood with the planer, but like yours, it has a 5" inlet. I will probably take the time now to modify it to handle a 6" hose. Your timely submission of this topic will be a big help!
Unfortunately, the Tanny J-250 is going to have to be sacrificed to make room for the planer. I hate to have to do this, but the planer has to take priority.

For some reason, I could not get the image to paste, so I put in the url.

Bill


https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-9IN2VHccrjU/UGuhjifptwI/AAAAAAAADFg/FEWkycS3tLM/s600/Oliver299-5.JPG?gl=US
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crzypete



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 1689
Location: New York State

PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2012 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, sweet 299! some days I think of upgrading my 399 and the 299 seems like the only choice.

WHat are you running now? I will be curious to hear how the 299 performs on smaller pieces of wood. I worry that it is a beast designed for major production milling and would not be as delicate with smaller wood more associated with furniture. Will you keep two planers?

I think of the 399 being designed for schools which is lighter duty and smaller pieces.

Too bad the Tanny has to go. Especially after all that work. Bu I completely understand that space is the biggest premium. It has become more and more important to me.

Let's see if I can post the picture.

[img]https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-9IN2VHccrjU/UGuhjifptwI/AAAAAAAADFg/FEWkycS3tLM/s600/Oliver299-5.JPG?gl=US[/img]

Not sure why it wont post, perhaps the secure server. One of these days I will upgrade the forum software. Thew new version allows for photo hosting.

Was it bought locally? Which cutterhead? Year of manufacture?

Pete
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chathamworkshop



Joined: 11 Sep 2010
Posts: 72
Location: Chatham, NJ

PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2012 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Pete: The planer was made in 1948, and has the original 3 blade cylinder. It also has a complete knife grinding system. The electrics were modified with newer A/B magnetic 440 V starters, but I am not happy with the job that was done, and will probably make some changes when I put in 240 V magnetic starters .
I have been using a 15" Powermatic planer, but was finding it undersized. I was looking for a 20" Powermatic, when this one came along at the right price. I took a gamble and got it. It is certainly larger than I had planned for, but the key factor will be its performance which is yet to be determined. To your point, I may hold onto the Powermatic for awhile to do the smaller pieces, while I am getting used to the 299.
Not sure why I am having problems transferring photos. I have been using Google Picasa to store photos for several years, and never had a problem until now. However, I think the problem is on my end or with Google, since I also encounter the same issue with Vintage Machinery.
Edit: I just changed over to Photo Bucket, and that seems to work.


Bill
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